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Cheatography

Frequently Misspelled Words

absence
accidentally
accommodate
accommodation
accomplish
achieve
acquire
acquit
advice
aggression
aggressive
all right
amateur
apparent
apparently
appearance
arctic
argument
assassination
basically
beginning
bicycle
biscuit
bizarre
broccoli
bureau
candidate
Caribbean
category
cemetery
changeable
colleague
column
coming
committee
completely
conscientious
conscious
criticize
curiosity
deceive
definite
definitely
descent
development
dilemma
disappear
disappoint
disastrous
dominant
easily
ecstasy
either
embarrass
environment
equipment
equipped
exaggerate
excellent
except
existence
expect
experience
explan­ation
Fahrenheit
familiar
fascinate
February
finally
financially
fluorescent
foreign
fundamental
further
generally
glamorous
grammar
grateful
guarantee
guard
harass
height
humorous
ignorance
immediate
incidentally
intelligence
interrupt
jewelry
judgment
knowledge
leisure
liaison
library
license
lightning
maintenance
mathematics
mediocre
miniature
miscellaneous
misspell
mosquito
mysterious
necessary
neighbor
occasionally
occurred
official
particular
persistent
physical
pleasant
potatoes
precede
preferred
prejudice
principal
privilege
propaganda
pursuit
restaurant
rhythm
scissors
seize
sense
separate
sincerely
success
tongue
truly
unfort­unately
until
vacuum
weird
you're

Commonly Misused Words

A
An
And
Abstruse
Obtuse
Accept
Except
Except
Accidental
Incidental
Ad
Add
Adapt
Adopt
Adverse
Averse
Advice
Advise
Affect
Effect
Aggravate
Irritate
Aid
Aide
Air
Heir
Aisle
I'll
Isle
Alley
Ally
Allot
A Lot
Alot
All Ready
Already
All Together
Altogether
Allude
Elude
Allusion
Illusion
Allusive
Elusive
Altar
Alter
Alternate
Alternative
Among
Between
Amoral
Immoral
Amount
Number
Anonymous
Unanimous
Anxious
Eager
Anyone
Any One
Are
Our
Assumption
Presumption
Assure
Ensure
Insure
Ate
Eight
Attain
Obtain
Bail
Bale
Band
Banned
Bare
Bear
Base
Bass
Beside
Besides
Buy
By
Bye
Capital
Capitol
Cease
Seize
Siege
Ceiling
Sealing
Cell
Sell
Censor
Censure
Sensor
Cent
Scent
Sent
Cereal
Serial
Choose
Chose
Chosen
Eventually
Ultimately
Few (Fewer)
Little (Less)
Finally
Finely
Find
Fined
Flour
Flower
For
Fore
Four
Forth
Fourth
Good
Well
Grate
Great
Guessed
Guest
Have
Of
Hay
Hey
Hear
Here
Heroin
Heroine
Higher
Hire
Hoarse
Horse
Hole
Whole
Hoping
Hopping
Hour
Our
I
Me
Its
It's
Know
No
Later
Latter
Lay
Lie
Lets
Let's
Loose
Lose
Mail
Male
Many
Much
Nobody
None
No One
Passed
Past
Than
Then
Their
There
They're
Threw
Through
Thru
To
Too
Two
Vain
Vane
Vein
Waist
Waste
Wait
Weight
Weather
Whether
Were
We're
Where
Who
Which
That
Who
Whom
Whose
Who's
Your
You're

Differ­ences

Its and It's
Its= possession
It's­ = it is or it has
You're and Your
Your = belonging to you
You're = you are
They're, Their, There
They're = they are
there = a place
their = possessive
Affect and Effect
affect = to act upon or have an influence on
effect = to bring about or create; change
ie and eg
ie  = in other words
eg = for example

Parts of Speech

Noun
names a person, place, thing, idea (Lulu, jail, cantal­oupe, loyalty, and so on)
Pronoun
takes the place of a noun (he, who, I, what, and so on). They may be used only as subjects or subject comple­men­ts:I, he, she, we, they, who, whoever. They may be used only as objects or objective comple­men­ts:me, him, her, us, them, whom, whomever. May be used as either subjects or object­s: you, it, everyone, anyone, no one, someone, mine, ours, yours, theirs, either, neither, each, everybody, anybody, nobody, somebody, everyt­hing, anything, nothing, something, any, none, some, which, what, that. Pronouns that show posses­sio­n: my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, their, theirs, whose.
Verb
expresses action or being (scram­bled, was, should win, and so on)
Adjective
describes a noun or pronoun (messy, strange, alien, and so on)
Adverb
describes a verb, adjective, or other adverb (willi­ngly, woefully, very, and so on)
Preposition
relates a noun or a pronoun to another word in the sentence (by, for, from, and so on)
Conjunction
ties two words or groups of words together (and, after, although, and so on)
Interjection
expresses strong emotion (yikes! wow! ouch! and so on)

Verb Tense Tips in English Grammar

Simple present tense
 tells what is happening now
Simple past tense
tells what happened before now
Simple future
talks about what has not happened yet
Present perfect tense
expresses an action or state of being in the present that has some connection with the past
Past perfect tense
places an event before another event in the past
Future perfect tense
talks about something that has not happened yet in relation to another event in the future

Placing Proper Punctu­ation

. ? !
Endmarks
All sentences need an endmark: a period, question mark, exclam­ation point, or ellipsis. Never put two endmarks at the end of the same sentence.
'
Apostrophes
For singular ownership, generally add’s; for plural ownership, generally add s’.
,
Commas
In direct address, use commas to separate the name from the rest of the sentence. In lists, place commas between items in a list, but not before the first item. Before conjun­ctions, when combining two complete sentences with a conjun­ction, place a comma before the conjun­ction. If you have one subject and two verbs, don’t put a comma before the conjun­ction.
( )
Hyphens
If two words create a single descri­ption, put a hyphen between them if the descri­ption comes before the word that it’s descri­bing. Don’t hyphenate two-word descri­ptions if the first word ends in -ly.
:
Colon
Use a colon after an indepe­ndent clause that precedes a list and to separate an explan­ation, rule, or example from a preceding indepe­ndent clause.
;
Semicolon
Use a semicolon to join indepe­ndent clauses in compound sentences that do not have coordi­nating conjun­ctions (and, or, but, nor, for, so, yet) and commas as connec­tors. Words like h­owever, moreover, thus, ­and­the­ref­ore­, are often used as connectors in these sentences. You can also use semicolons to separate long or compli­cated items in a series that already includes commas, and to separate two long or complex indepe­ndent clauses joined by a coordi­nating conjun­ction if confusion would result from using a comma.

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