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Cheatography

Organizational Development: The Big Picture Cheat Sheet (DRAFT) by [deleted]

This is a draft cheat sheet. It is a work in progress and is not finished yet.

Introd­uction

There are four major areas in business manage­ment: organi­zat­ional develo­pment, stakeh­older value manage­ment, profit manage­ment, and operations management Each of these major areas of affects the other in an integrated manner.

Organi­zat­ional Develo­pment

Organi­zat­ional Develo­pment

Affects how stakeh­older value manage­ment, profit manage­ment, and operations management increm­entally and radically improve to adapt to constant internal and external change:
Stakeh­older Value Management affects how value is engineered for different internal and external stakeh­olders, before, during, and after every step, which affects profit manage­ment, operations manage­ment, and organi­zat­ional develo­pment manage­ment.
Profit Management affects operat­ions, organi­zat­ional develo­pment, and stakeh­older value manage­ment, and is constantly seeking to decrease costs and increase revenues to increase profits, guided by quanti­tative and qualit­ative measur­ement and analysis.
Operations Management affects how organi­zat­ional resources are utilized to produce and deliver products and services to external and internal stakeh­olders.

1. Organi­zat­ional Develo­pment Management

Begins with organi­zat­ional learning, which frames, resear­ches, and analyzes the internal and external changes the organi­zation needs to adapt to in order to survive and grow.
Organi­zat­ional learning is accomp­lished at indivi­dual, group, organi­zat­ional and inter-­org­ani­zat­ional levels, which leverages the knowledge, skills, experi­ences and ideas of these different levels to brainstorm new ideas to adapt to internal and external changes to survive and grow.
 

2. Stakeh­older Value Management

Because organi­zations have limited resources, the creative ideas generated from the creativity management process of organi­zat­ional learning must be weighed using structured idea management to fund the idea that will create the greatest value for internal and external stakeh­olders, which results in increm­ental and radical innova­tions.

These innova­tions are designed, developed, evaluated, innovated, and integrated into the business and technology models, and into the organi­zat­ional design, effect­ively creating increm­ental and radical organi­zat­ional changes, inside and outside the organi­zation, rolled out using change management princi­ples.

The increm­ental and radical changes to the organi­zation and its products and services requires the internal stakeh­olders of the organi­zation to be trained or developed, so that they can keep up with the new changes, so that these internal stakeh­olders can relate these changes to external stakeh­olders.

Employing the organi­zat­ional develo­pment techniques of learning, creati­vity, structured idea manage­ment, and innova­tion, the human resources, marketing, sales, customer service, public relations, investor relations, and regulatory affairs depart­ments identify and commun­icate the best logical features and emotional benefits of the organi­zation to internal and external stakeh­olders, while minimizing any weaknesses and threats, to engineer value for stakeh­olders before, during, and after every step.

3. Profit Management

Conseq­uently, the organi­zation is perceived as more valuable than risky to stakeh­olders who then invest in the organi­zation and its products and services. The resulting revenues, expenses, profits, assets, liabil­ities, and equity are tracked by the accounting and taxation depart­ments, and reported to stakeh­olders, including the finance depart­ment, who helps the organi­zation value and model future revenues, expenses, profits, assets, liabil­ities, and equity under different scenarios, weighing cost and benefits.

4. Operations Management

Based on financial cost-b­enefit analysis, and using the organi­zat­ional develo­pment techniques of learning, creati­vity, structured idea manage­ment, and innova­tion, the organi­zat­ional activities and people that help the organi­zation adapt to change better, faster, and cheaper are kept and continue to be funded.

The organi­zat­ional activities and people that do not help the organi­zation adapt to change better, faster, and cheaper are modified and funded, or discarded and not funded, respec­tively.

In addition, organi­zat­ional activities and people that are likely to help the organi­zation adapt to change better, faster, and cheaper in the future are developed or acquired, using the funds that previously funded the newly discarded organi­zat­ional activities and people.

Employing the organi­zat­ional develo­pment techniques of learning, creati­vity, structured idea manage­ment, and innova­tion, the organi­zation then resumes production and delivery of its improved line of products and services for internal and external shareh­olders, and the organi­zat­ional develo­pment process starts a new cycle.