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Kounin: Principal Teachings Cheat Sheet (DRAFT) by [deleted]

Kounin: Principal Teachings

This is a draft cheat sheet. It is a work in progress and is not finished yet.

Introd­uction

Kounins model focuses on preven­tiv­edi­sci­pline techniques and strategies designedto prevent the occurrence of discipline problems in the first place Good classroom management depends on effective lesson manage­ment. Kounins key ideas include the "­ripple effect­," "­wit­hit­nes­s," "­ove­rla­ppi­ng,­" effective transi­tions, group focus, and satiation.

The techniques advocated by Kounin for class control are allint­ended to create and maintain a classroom atmosphere conducive to learning. By keeping students busily and happily engaged, behaviour problems are reduced to a minimum. Kounin does not believe that teachers person­ality traits arepar­tic­ularly important in classroom control. What is important, he insists, is teachers ability to manage groups and lessons

Kounin’s Principle Teaching

■ Teacher need to be more attentive to all aspects of classroom.
■ Effective teacher keep students attentive and actively involved.
■ Teacher should be able to attend to two event/­act­ivities at the same time.
■ Activities should be enjoyable and challe­nging.

Ripple Effect

Occurs when the teacher corrects a misbeh­avior in one student, and this positively influences the behavior of other nearby students.

■ It is influenced by the clarity and firmness of the correc­tion.
■ The effect is greater when the teacher clearly names the unacce­ptable behavior and gives the reasons for the desist. Exp: Firmness, that is, conveying an "I mean it" attitude, enhances the ripple effect.

Whithi­tness

■ Teachers awareness of what is going on in all parts of the classroom at all times or commonly refer as "­having eyes in the back of the head." Exp: If students are off-task and fooling around, the teacher needs to send a clear message that commun­icates to the students that the teacher sees that they are not working and they need to get started.
■ The effect­iveness of withitness is increased when the teacher can correctly identify the student who is the ‘insti­gator’ of the incident.
■ Teacher who target the wrong student for a desist or a reprimand are perceived by the students are not knowing what is really going on.
■ Teacher should intervene early and quickly in dealing with misbeh­avior. Failure to do so allows the misbeh­avior to spread

Overla­pping

■ Kounin states that overla­pping is the ability to attend to two issues at the same time. Exp: A teacher can deal effect­ively with an interr­uption while keeping an eye on the happenings across the gym.
■ Kounin found that teachers who are skilled at overla­pping were also more aware of what is going on in the classroom.
■ Students are more likely to stay on-task if they know that the teacher is aware of what they are doing and can help them when needed.
 

Koumin Principles

Overla­pping

■ Kounin states that overla­pping is the ability to attend to two issues at the same time. Exp: A teacher can deal effect­ively with an interr­uption while keeping an eye on the happenings across the gym.
■ Kounin found that teachers who are skilled at overla­pping were also more aware of what is going on in the classroom.
■ Students are more likely to stay on-task if they know that the teacher is aware of what they are doing and can help them when needed.

Effective Transi­tions

■ Kounins research revealed an important relati­onship between student behavior and movement within and between lessons. Notes:­Mov­ement = pacing­/mo­men­tum­/tr­ans­itions ≠ physical movement of teacher or students in the class
■ Teachers ability to move smoothly from one activity to the next, and to maintain momentum within an activity has a great deal to do with their effect­iveness in contro­lling behavior in the classroom.
■ In smooth transi­tions, student attention is turned easily from one activity to another, thus keeping student attention on the task at hand.
■ Teachers ability to move smoothly from one activity to the next, and to maintain momentum within an activity has a great deal to do with their effect­iveness in contro­lling behavior in the classroom.
In smooth transi­tions, student attention is turned easily from one activity to another, thus keeping student attention on the task at hand

Group Focus

■ The ability to keep members of the class or group paying attention to the task is essential in mainta­ining an efficient classroom and reducing student misbeh­aviour.
■ Effective grouping maximizes active partic­ipation and keeps students engaged in learning.
■ There are two techniques that can be used by the teacher during conducting a lesson in the class.

Measure Advantages

Accoun­tab­ility Powerful force in:
■ Record­-ke­eping When students know keeping students on-
■ Public recogn­ition that they will be held task
■ Skill testing accoun­table for their
■ Written work. learning and behavior and teachers know how each student is progre­ssing, student misbeh­avior decrea­ses.Al­erting Focusing the attention
■ Demons­tration Students become of group
■ Using questions to more alert and give check students more attention during unders­tanding the lesson­/ac­tiv­ities
■ Varying the student conducted by teacher. who is called upon to give an answer

Satiation

■ Means being satisfied or having enough
■ To describe students progre­ssive loss of interest in the task especially when students experience satiation or boredom. Exp: ☺ Work on the task without giving it much thought ☺ Try to create some excitement through fooling around with a classmate or engaging in other forms of misbeh­aviour
Kounin suggests reducing satiation by…Pro­viding students with a feeling of progress Offering students challenges throughout the lesson Being enthus­iastic. Using different teaching styles and add variety to the lesson